Your Source for Organic Plant-Based, Gluten-Free Recipes, Holistic Health, Cleanse and Detox, Toxin-Free Living

Dry Brushing

 

 

I discovered dry brushing a few years ago and fell in love with it! I started using the technique to improve my skin and smooth out those little dimples on the back of my thighs. It wasn’t until a little while later that I discovered dry brushing also stimulated detoxification. In fact, it is one of the most inexpensive ways to support your body’s detoxification processes, while achieving vibrant glowing skin. With all of the hype in the health & beauty industry, I bet you wish you would have known this sooner!!

 

Your Lymphatic System – Your Health and Beauty River

The Lymphatic System is part of the Immune System. It is composed of a one-way system of vessels that carry lymph toward the heart. Its main function is to collect and transport tissue fluids from the intercellular spaces in the tissues of the body, back to the veins in the blood system. Other important functions involve removing your body’s own dead cellular debris, creating lymphocytes (white blood cells), and filtering micro-organisms (such as bacteria) and other toxins. The lymphatic system does not have a pump and relies on movement for circulation.

Dry brushing stimulates both lymphatic and blood circulations simultaneously. And since there is more lymph in your body than blood, assisting to keep your lymph river moving everyday is vitally important to your health and GLOWING SKIN.

 

Beautiful Skin

The skin is the largest eliminative organ and is responsible for approximately 25% of the body’s daily detoxification. Mostly through the sweat glands, the skin is designed to eliminate 1-2 pounds of waste acids each day. Yet, if you are not moving, sweating and breathing (deeply) everyday, your skin cannot adequately detoxify to its potential. Dry brushing helps to accelerate your skin’s detoxification process, remove dead skin cells and stimulate oil producing glands.

 

What Dry Brushing Can Do For You:

  • Assist with whole body detoxification (when used daily)
  • Stimulate blood circulation
  • Stimulate lymphatic circulation
  • Strengthen and tighten the skin
  • Stimulate oil producing glands
  • Improve dry skin
  • Eliminate cellulite
  • Decrease body odor

 

Selecting a Skin Brush

Be sure to select a brush or loofah with natural bristles from plants. Synthetic bristles can be harsh and cause irritation. I recommend that you find a brush with a shorter handle to use for your legs, arms, and nooks n crannies. A brush with a long handle is good to use for the back. Health stores usually have a nice selection of brushes and loofahs. I just ask that you look for natural bristles from plants instead from Boar Bristles. Loofing your body in a kind way would feel so much better, I promise!

I personally use the Yerba Prima Tampico Brush with a removable head. It’s perfect for long and short strokes. These Garshana Gloves are perfect for those with delicate, sensitive skin.

 

 

Directions for Dry Brushing

  1. Start with the bottom of the foot, and move the brush or loofah in small circular motions. Then move to the top of the foot and do the same.
  2. Work up to the ankles and continue up the leg using the same soft circular motions, always toward the heart. Take a little extra time over the dimply or fatty areas on the thighs and buttocks, as dry brushing helps to eliminate cellulite. Stroke all the way to the hips and groin.
  3. Repeat on the other side.
  4. After you are finished with the lower half, start at the fingertips of one arm and move up the arm (palms of hands, back of hands, forearm, bicep) and toward the heart. End at the shoulder blades. Repeat on other arm.
  5. Move to the back working your circular movements toward your stomach, starting and finishing with one side of the back and then the other.
  6. When you get to your stomach, start at your lower abdomen and work your way up. Stroke across the abdomen in a clockwise motion toward the heart, and end at your chest in an upward stroke. Be careful around the delicate areas such as the nipples.
  7. Move to the back of the neck and gently stroke downward toward the heart and finish at the front of the neck.
  8. Ending at the chest, stroke sideways back-and-forth.
  9. Rinse off and shower as normal.


Skin brushing Tips

  • Avoid the face! Dry brushing is too rough for the delicate skin on your face.
  • It’s sometimes best to dry brush in the shower (with the water off) since there may be a lot of dead skin debris.
  • Since your pores are wide open, use a natural body soap without harsh cleansers, parabens and other toxins when you shower off. Invigorating soaps with essential oils are nice to use.
  • As an extra treat, finish your shower with a coconut oil rub. This is especially nice during the winter when skin tends to be drier. After washing your body, rinse in hot water. Then vigorously rub the coconut oil into your skin, rinse and pat dry.

 

How Often Should You Dry Brush?

For best results dry brush every morning before your shower. A good dry brushing session lasts about 10 minutes. After you do this for a while, you’ll quickly become addicted to your soft, glowing skin. You’ll never want to give it up!

Now that you know the fabulous results that skin brushing can give you, I’d love to hear your thoughts. Or if you have found amazing results with your skin brushing routine, please share in the comment section below. And as always, if you found this information to be helpful and would like more updates, come on over and join me on FacebookTwitterPinterest and Instagram.

 

 

468 ad

15 Comments

  1. Hi, I have one, for me, very important question as my skin tends to be very dry. Must I rinse my body after dry brushing with “hot water”? In the winter months & try my best to use cooler shower water so as to not further dry my skin out.

    Thank you in advance for your prompt reply 🙂

    Peace ~
    Yvonne

    • Yvonne, it’s not necessary to rinse with hot water. You may also want to follow the recommendation in the post, and finish with a coconut oil rub to help with the dry skin.

  2. My dermatologist indicated that taking a cooler shower or bath helps prevent breakdown of natural skin oils and reduces itching which is especially aggravating in dryer climates such as Idaho and Utah where I grew up and have lived for many years. I lived in southern Texas for 17 years and humidity is very kind to the skin and virtually eliminated itching and cracking/bleeding of dry skin.

  3. Hi Kim, you have an attractive website. I truly enjoy dry brushing. I place my brush next to my vitamins. My skin feels buttery soft. It has improved the appearance of cellulite, and with improving my diet a bit more I believe I will have greater results. I’ve owned my brush for about 18 years but didn’t begin using it extensively until 2013 🙁 I let life get in the way when I should have dedicated more time for me. I hope more people will take up the practice of brushing. The information on your site is helpful. I will visit again to read the recipes.

    • Thanks Barbara! Hope the dry brushing continues to treat you well. 🙂

  4. Hey Kim,
    Great site! I’ve been dry brushing for about 2 years and YES it is additive. It takes me about 5 mins before my morning shower. I do take 1 or 2 days off per week. A great tip to do right after dry brushing is to further cleanse the adrenals with a hot/cold shower (alternate one minute of each) – as much as you can take of each without any pain. It’s crazy but awesome!

    Audrey

    • Thank you Audrey. The alternating hot/cold shower would be an excellent addition to dry brushing! 🙂

  5. Do you have any recommendations for a brush with softer bristles. I have the one you recommend here in this blog, but I think it might be too much for my mom. I’m hoping to help get her started on a routine.

  6. I heard dry brushing was great for the face, may you please advise further? Great site by the way!

    • Thank you Farrah. As far as dry brushing your face, I wouldn’t recommend it. It seems to me that it would be too harsh, at least with the dry brushes I have. There are soft gloves used for dry brushing, and they may be more gentle for your face.

  7. I am 47. For the past seven years I have been dry skin brushing off and on. Wish it was more on. Tend to do it for several months and then stop for several months. But when I am doing it, I do this routine several times a week: dry skin brush whole body, then massage cold pressed apricot oil all over, then get into shower and using warm water I rinse off all the oil (using a cotton face cloth to help remove it) and use a natural soap to clean. Then have a cold rinse before getting out, patting dry and moisturizing with the same oil. I sometimes use sweet almond oil or hemp oil too. But I never use coconut oil, as I actually find it blocks my pores over time and is very drying for me in the long run. Once a week I also dry brush my face. But I have brought a special Bernard Jensen Complexion Soft Brush for that. I also use the oil for cleansing and moisturizing my face. Never wear make-up. I often get complimented on my complexion, so must be doing something right. Drinking fresh vegetable juice and water daily helps too. I wish I had started this routine from a much younger age; but better late than never.

    • Thank you for sharing your experience, Mary. I’ve actually been using avocado oil lately, and find that my skin absorbs it quite nicely. I’ll have to try the cold-pressed apricot oil too.

  8. Must I always shower after dry brushing or can I wipe down with a damp wash cloth?

    • Faith, good question. There really aren’t “rules” for dry brushing, the showering aspect is for washing off dead skin cells. As long as you do the dry brushing, whatever you feel like doing after, I suggest you do!

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *